AKAWINI, REGION 2

Bountiful harvests result from Quiko’s use of carbon credit funds for savannah farming while the livelihoods of women and youths experience remarkable development

Akawini and the LCDS 2030

Akawini is the largest Indigenous village in administrative Region 2. It can be found about 105 km from Charity via the Pomeroon River. The village’s 1,300 residents mainly have Carib, Warrau and Arawak roots. For 2023, Akawini got G$ 35,000,000 of Guyana’s carbon credits revenue through the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030. The villagers used their allocation for 10 community-developed projects that would especially benefit the youths of Akawini. The areas of investment are shown in the graph below

Akawini and the LCDS 2030

Social
1
Health
2
Transportation
2
Infrastructure
4

Akawini’s 2023 developmental projects

Kitchen and Dining Hall

Youths’ education and well-being are at the heart of Akawini’s 2023 LCDS projects. At least 130 children are the key beneficiaries of most of the projects. These are a newl

y constructed, equipped, and furnished a kitchen and dining hall for the school’s feeding programme; engine boats

to transport students between their homes and schools; rails to prevent children from falling off a high, winding, and long bridge; and facilities to support recreational

Students going home in their new engine boat

activities, i.e., 3 pavilions with 3 adjoining newly constructed sanitary blocks (a pavilion was constructed, one was extended, and another was enhanced).

Railed Bridge

In addition to the youth-focused projects mentioned above, Akawini embarked on 2 other projects that targeted the village in a broader sense. These were the distribution of grants to farmers and owners of small businesses and the construction of a boathouse. Importantly, the boathouse stores

Boathouse

the boat that is the village’s water ambulance which is critical for urgent /emergency situations Apart from the projects and benefits mentioned above, the wider community also gained from these developments in the form of 10 employment opportunities within the field of construction.

Pavilion with Sanitary Block
Kitchen and Dining Hall

Youths’ education and well-being are at the heart of Akawini’s 2023 LCDS projects. At least 130 children are the key beneficiaries of most of the projects. These are a newl

y constructed, equipped, and furnished a kitchen and dining hall for the school’s feeding programme; engine boats

to transport students between their homes and schools; rails to prevent children from falling off a high, winding, and long bridge; and facilities to support recreational

Students going home in their new engine boat

activities, i.e., 3 pavilions with 3 adjoining newly constructed sanitary blocks (a pavilion was constructed, one was extended, and another was enhanced).

Railed Bridge

In addition to the youth-focused projects mentioned above, Akawini embarked on 2 other projects that targeted the village in a broader sense. These were the distribution of grants to farmers and owners of small businesses and the construction of a boathouse. Importantly, the boathouse stores

Boathouse

the boat that is the village’s water ambulance which is critical for urgent /emergency situations Apart from the projects and benefits mentioned above, the wider community also gained from these developments in the form of 10 employment opportunities within the field of construction.

Pavilion with Sanitary Block

What do residents have to say?

“I have lived in Akawini for 56 years. I do farming and I have a little snackette. I am very thankful for the G$ 50,000 grant that I received to assist me with my small businesses” – Ms Arlene Campbell, Resident

“The LCDS programme is undoubtedly a great initiative. The children received an engine boat which helped to drastically improve their punctuality. They are also more comfortable and safer in the new dining hall” – Mr Albert Gildhary, Senior Master, Akawini Primary School Annex

“My community is really benefitting from the carbon credits. It created jobs within the village. The local skilled workers that I hired to build the boathouse were incredibly happy about the opportunity. This boathouse will extend the service life of our emergency boat that will serve all our people for a longer period” – Ms Heisene Lyota Gurd, Contractor, and Retired Midwife

Akawini’s secret to success and Looking ahead

Mr Rudolph Wilson, Toshao

The low level of water in rivers was a major challenge for the transportation of building materials into Akawini. This was compounded by a shortage of skilled persons within the village to undertake the various construction projects envisioned for the community. Nonetheless, these issues did not prevent the Akawini from promptly completing all its projects. Residents worked together to land the building materials, workers were imported from nearby villages as necessary, contractual agreements were made, and the council conducted vigilant monitoring to ensure the successful implementation of all projects. Akawini’s Toshao is thankful for the novel carbon credit programme and the LCDS 2030. He is especially grateful that students no longer spend 4-6 hours travelling in paddle boats to and from school and for the transfer of technical knowledge and skills to the people of Akawini. The village plans to venture into economic projects like eco-tourism with their 2024 LCDS allocation.

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BETHANY, REGION 2

Bethany injects over G$ 15 million of carbon credits finance  to modernise, grow, and transform the village’s sustainable logging industry

Bethany and the LCDS 2030

Bethany which means ‘House of Figs’ is an Indigenous village that was established in 1969. It is in administrative region 2, about 8 km up the Supenaam Creek. For 2023, Bathany’s 545 residents, most of whom are Arawak and Carib descendants, received G$ 24,000,000 of Guyana’s carbon credits revenue under the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030. Bethany is a sustainable logging and farming village. As such, the villagers collectively decided to use most of their allocation to bolster their main economic activity (sustainable logging). The graph below shows Bethany’s 4 investment areas.

Bethany and the LCDS – 2023 at a glance

Bethany’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Bethany’s 2023 LCDS developmental projects

On 19 February 2023, the residents of Bethany met and discussed projects that would contribute to the sustainable development of their village. They collectively decided on the 5 projects detailed below.

Over G$ 15 million was utilised to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of sustainable logging in Bethany. This included the acquisition of a powerful, yet fuel-efficient tractor and trailer that decreases the number of trips per load by two-thirds or 66% while burning less fossil fuel and emitting less Greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The village also built a garage to safeguard these 2 assets.

Bethany recognizes that a prosperous future depends largely upon youths and that education is critical for the success of children. As such, residents channelled G$ 3 million into a boat, to reliably transport students between their homes and schools.

Both the villagers and visitors of Bethany now enjoy additional modern lavatory facilities due to the ≈ G$ 2 million investment to construct, tile, paint, and outfit a sanitary block with three individual compartments.

Bethany’s new sanitary block

On 19 February 2023, the residents of Bethany met and discussed projects that would contribute to the sustainable development of their village. They collectively decided on the 5 projects detailed below.

Over G$ 15 million was utilised to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of sustainable logging in Bethany. This included the acquisition of a powerful, yet fuel-efficient tractor and trailer that decreases the number of trips per load by two-thirds or 66% while burning less fossil fuel and emitting less Greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The village also built a garage to safeguard these 2 assets.

Bethany recognizes that a prosperous future depends largely upon youths and that education is critical for the success of children. As such, residents channelled G$ 3 million into a boat, to reliably transport students between their homes and schools.

Both the villagers and visitors of Bethany now enjoy additional modern lavatory facilities due to the ≈ G$ 2 million investment to construct, tile, paint, and outfit a sanitary block with three individual compartments.

Bethany’s new sanitary block

What do residents have to say?

“We are benefitting big time from the LCDS. The LCDS money made it possible for us to buy a brand-new tractor. Because of its efficiency and capability, this tractor enables its main users to save money and earn more income for their families. Anyone who needs large or heavy items transported can benefit from this tractor. Persons use it to transport goods at a low cost. The garage is also beneficial as the machine can be parked, secured, protected from the elements, and maintained in comfort” – Mr Oswal Dyer, Tractor Operator

“Me and many others did not have the opportunity to receive a formal education, so I am very grateful that the children will have a boat to take them to school and bring them back home. Not only my children, but every student would benefit” – Mr Roy Marslow, Resident

“I am very happy about the Sanitary Block project. I hope that we will continue to receive money from the carbon credits for our development” – Ms Alisa Wilson, Resident

Bethany’s secret to success and Looking ahead

Bethany needed to reallocate their 2023 LCDS funds after the quotations received for some of the projects exceeded the amounts anticipated by the village. Additionally,  the village experienced lags with the procurement of certain building materials for the sanitary block and the customisation of the tractor’s trailer. Nonetheless, the village council and the LCDS management committee overcame those challenges with ease to expeditiously deliver on all the projects. They credit vigilant monitoring for their success.

Bethany’s Toshao and the Vice-chairperson of the National Toshaos’ Council (NTC) is thankful for the development taking place in her village and in all Indigenous villages across the country. She noted that revenue generated from the operation of their tractor & trailer is already being used to fund additional development in her village, such as a second boat for primary school students. Bethany finalised its LCDS projects for 2024 and eagerly awaits disbursement.

CAPOEY, REGION 2

Guyana’s carbon credits revenue delivers a Multipurpose Building to Capoey, catalyses the village’s Sand Mining Operation, and results in a Hallow Blocks Factory

Capoey and the LCDS 2030

Capoey is an Indigenous village in administrative region 2 that encompasses a glistening lake of the same Wapishiana name that means “Land of the Rising Moon”. Capoey is home to about 630 Arawak / Lokono descendants who are the beneficiaries of G$ 24,000,000 from Guyana’s carbon credits revenue under the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030. These individuals brainstormed investment ideas and decided on 5 important projects that would help their village develop sustainably. These are a multipurpose building, front loader, hollow block factory, pavilion (repairs), and lavatory. The pie chart below depicts Capoey’s investment areas

Capoey and the LCDS – 2023 at a glance

Capoey’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Capoey’s 2023 LCDS developmental projects

For over a decade, Capoey’s residents recognised and longed for a suitable space to host meetings, training sessions / workshops and functions, such as weddings. However, this vision remained a dream for many years due to financial constraints. Thankfully, Guyana’s transformational carbon credits revenue turns dreams into realities. Capoey used over G$ 9.5 million of its 2023 LCDS funds to construct, roof, tile, paint, furnish, electrify, and equip its first multipurpose centre.

Moreover, residents spent almost G$ 2 million to procure a front loader (bucket) for one of its tractors shown in the image below. This additional loader essentially doubles the productivity and, therefore, the earnings of the village’s striving sand mining business.

Front Loader attached to a tractor

 

In tandem with the increase in sand production, Capoey invested approximately G$ 2.1 million to construct, shed, paint, equip and stock their very own Hollow Block production facility that produced thousands of blocks since the commencement of operation. The facility, a block maker in action and some of the blocks that were made are shown below.  

Block maker hard at work
Hollow Blocks Factory
Hollow Blocks ready for sale

For over a decade, Capoey’s residents recognised and longed for a suitable space to host meetings, training sessions / workshops and functions, such as weddings. However, this vision remained a dream for many years due to financial constraints. Thankfully, Guyana’s transformational carbon credits revenue turns dreams into realities. Capoey used over G$ 9.5 million of its 2023 LCDS funds to construct, roof, tile, paint, furnish, electrify, and equip its first multipurpose centre.

Moreover, residents spent almost G$ 2 million to procure a front loader (bucket) for one of its tractors shown in the image below. This additional loader essentially doubles the productivity and, therefore, the earnings of the village’s striving sand mining business.

Front Loader attached to a tractor

 

In tandem with the increase in sand production, Capoey invested approximately G$ 2.1 million to construct, shed, paint, equip and stock their very own Hollow Block production facility that produced thousands of blocks since the commencement of operation. The facility, a block maker in action and some of the blocks that were made are shown below.  

Block maker hard at work
Hollow Blocks Factory
Hollow Blocks ready for sale

What do residents have to say?

“I no longer have to travel a far distance outside of my village to make blocks and earn a living. Thanks to the LCDS and carbon credits, I have a job right in Capoey” – Mr Andel Carter, Block maker

“We never had these kinds of developments and projects in our village. We put our money to good use for the benefit of the people” – Deputy Toshao

“The LCDS 2030 and the Carbon Credit Programme can only be described as a blessing to Capoey” – Mr Ralph Hendricks, Toshao of Capoey for 21 years

Capoey’s success story and Looking ahead

Capoey’s village council and LCDS financial/management committee made necessary adjustments to the scopes and budgets of their projects; procured all their construction materials in advance; and conducted daily monitoring to guarantee the timely completion of their first set of projects. The village will proceed to complete repairs to two of its pavilions for their youths as well as construct a lavatory facility to improve sanitation before it embarks on its LCDS projects for 2024.

ST. DENYS TAPAKUMA, REGION 2

Not only does Tapakuma’s carbon credit finance create jobs, secure food, and facilitate sports, but it also gives hope to the elderly and even helps to save lives!

Tapakuma and the LCDS 2030

Tapakuma’s welcoming archway

Saint Denys Tapakuma is an Indigenous village in administrative region 2 with a captivating lake of the same name at its northeastern tip. The village was partially named after its first priest (Denys) and can be found about 23 km from Anna Regina via a scenic trail. St Denys is home to about 440 residents of Wakapao and Akawini origins who are the beneficiaries of G$ 18,000,000 from Guyana’s Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030 carbon credit earnings. On 18 April 2023, Tapakuma held a village meeting where the residents collectively decided to utilise their funds for 7 projects in the 6 investment areas shown below that would improve the standard of living and quality of life for all in St. Denys.

Tapakuma and the LCDS – 2023 at a glance

Tapakuma’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Tapakuma’s 2023 developmental projects

Upgraded Village Office
Refurbished Cassava processing facility

For its governance project, the village set aside G$ 1 million to upgrade its village office so that the residents could receive more efficient service from the village council in a more comfortable setting. This included work on the building’s roof. The villagers also allocated another G$ 1 million to rehabilitate the structure which houses their cassava processing enterprise with the aim of ensuring that their products are manufactured in a facility that satisfies food production standards.

To address the concern of food security in Tapakuma, the village decided to invest a total of G$ 8 million in Agriculture between livestock and crops equally. For the first time in the history of St Denys, large scale poultry rearing would be done to offset local demand while a shade house would be built to provide optimal conditions for the growth of crops.

Poultry pen (left) and Shade house (right) under construction1-2
Poultry pen (left) and Shade house (right) under construction2-2
Angled back blade

Tapakuma earmarked the remainder of its 2023 LCDS carbon credit funds for the procurement of floodlights for the community ground (to the delight of the local football team) and an angled back blade for their tractor for the High Point road repair project and similar endeavours.

Upgraded Village Office
Refurbished Cassava processing facility

For its governance project, the village set aside G$ 1 million to upgrade its village office so that the residents could receive more efficient service from the village council in a more comfortable setting. This included work on the building’s roof. The villagers also allocated another G$ 1 million to rehabilitate the structure which houses their cassava processing enterprise with the aim of ensuring that their products are manufactured in a facility that satisfies food production standards.

To address the concern of food security in Tapakuma, the village decided to invest a total of G$ 8 million in Agriculture between livestock and crops equally. For the first time in the history of St Denys, large scale poultry rearing would be done to offset local demand while a shade house would be built to provide optimal conditions for the growth of crops.

Poultry pen (left) and Shade house (right) under construction1-2
Poultry pen (left) and Shade house (right) under construction2-2
Angled back blade

Tapakuma earmarked the remainder of its 2023 LCDS carbon credit funds for the procurement of floodlights for the community ground (to the delight of the local football team) and an angled back blade for their tractor for the High Point road repair project and similar endeavours.

What do residents have to say?

“Our agricultural projects would create a lot of employment within Tapakuma. They would allow residents to easily access a reliable supply of vegetables and poultry products at lower costs. The school’s hot meal kitchen would benefit in a similar way – Ms Viveen Gonsalves, Community Service Officer

“I rely solely on my pension to get by. That is why I was so happy about the LCDS projects as I got the opportunity to earn by clearing the land for the chicken pen” – Ms Joyce Roberts, a 75-year-old pensioner

“I am very thankful for the back blade used to fix and smooth our road. Now, I spend less money to maintain my taxi and I earn more since trip times are cut in half. If our road was not fixed, passengers could have died in my vehicle before they reached the hospital. This LCDS is saving lives” - Mr Marlon Roberts, Resident Taxi Driver

Tapakuma’s secret to success and Looking ahead

St. Denys faced challenges in the forms of delays and underestimation for a few of its developmental projects. Nevertheless, the village council and LCDS management / financial committee easily overcame these hurdles to forge

Mr Aubrey Fredericks

ahead with their work. The village attributes its progress to the rapid procurement and the timely delivery of building materials and equipment.

Mr Aubrey Fredericks, Toshao of St. Denys Tapakuma is thankful for the development taking place in his village and other Indigenous communities across the country. He noted that using the earnings from Guyana’s forests for Indigenous development is an ingenious idea. Tapakuma will work assiduously to complete all its 2023 LCDS projects before embarking upon those already identified for 2024. The village has moved on from logging and looks to pursue agriculture, value-added products, and other sustainable development projects.

MORAIKOBAI, REGION 5

Moraikobai’s Tourism and Agriculture sectors are poised for monumental transformations with carbon credit finance

Moraikobai and the LCDS 2030

Moraikobai which translates to “Heart of the Mora Tree” is an indigenous village on the southern border of administrative region 5, about 4 km up the Mahaicony Creek. The 1,200 residents of this village received G$ 35,000,000 for 2023 from Guyana’s carbon credit revenues through the Low Carbon Development  Strategy (LCDS). The villagers agreed to invest their allocation in 15 projects with a heavy focus on Tourism and Agriculture/Food Security as depicted in the following bar graph:

Moraikobai and the LCDS – 2023 at a glance

Moraikobai’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Moraikobai’s 2023 LCDS Developmental Projects & Plans

Weary travellers eager to board the Pick-Up

Moraikobai took a holistic approach to the development of tourism in the village. This is evident from the following 6 diverse yet integrated tourism-related projects that residents chose to pursue revenue generation within their village: (1) acquisition of a Pick-Up Truck to transport tourists; (2) construction of a Kitchen and Dining Area to efficiently and comfortably cater for tourists; (3) development of the Ubudee website to provide information and receive bookings for Moraikobai’s various enthralling tourism products; (4) purchase of a canoe for creek paddling; (5) acquisition of camp gears and bicycles for recreational activities; and (6) construction of 2 eco-cabins.

Kitchen and Dining Area under construction
Cassava Cultivation Pilot

Moraikobai has a visionary plan to boost its agriculture, food security and village economy. This plan hinges on both crops and livestock. Regarding crops and starting with a pilot, the village will cultivate cassava on savannah land to avoid deforestation thereby helping to mitigate climate change. To maximize the value of the produce, a cassava milling and packaging facility would be constructed to accelerate the export of cassava flour. Moreover, the village intends to cultivate pineapple for export and construct a shade house to supply local farmers with affordable seedlings.     

Fogging machine.

             

Village council hosting a
Pontoon in final stage of completion

As it relates to livestock, Moraikobai plans to acquire 500 broilers that will be reared in a pen that is currently in the design phase. This project will initially supply the local market but would additionally and ultimately serve regional and national markets upon enhancements to production and packaging. The village took the first step for these agricultural enterprises by procuring various equipment and tools including a Governance in Moraikobai is now more comfortable and efficient as residents, visitors, and staff benefit from the new lavatory, furniture, and equipment at the village office. Finally, the villagers invested in a Pontoon and will upgrade an internal trail to improve transportation.

Weary travellers eager to board the Pick-Up

Moraikobai took a holistic approach to the development of tourism in the village. This is evident from the following 6 diverse yet integrated tourism-related projects that residents chose to pursue revenue generation within their village: (1) acquisition of a Pick-Up Truck to transport tourists; (2) construction of a Kitchen and Dining Area to efficiently and comfortably cater for tourists; (3) development of the Ubudee website to provide information and receive bookings for Moraikobai’s various enthralling tourism products; (4) purchase of a canoe for creek paddling; (5) acquisition of camp gears and bicycles for recreational activities; and (6) construction of 2 eco-cabins.

Kitchen and Dining Area under construction
Cassava Cultivation Pilot

Moraikobai has a visionary plan to boost its agriculture, food security and village economy. This plan hinges on both crops and livestock. Regarding crops and starting with a pilot, the village will cultivate cassava on savannah land to avoid deforestation thereby helping to mitigate climate change. To maximize the value of the produce, a cassava milling and packaging facility would be constructed to accelerate the export of cassava flour. Moreover, the village intends to cultivate pineapple for export and construct a shade house to supply local farmers with affordable seedlings.     

Fogging machine.

             

Village council hosting a
Pontoon in final stage of completion

As it relates to livestock, Moraikobai plans to acquire 500 broilers that will be reared in a pen that is currently in the design phase. This project will initially supply the local market but would additionally and ultimately serve regional and national markets upon enhancements to production and packaging. The village took the first step for these agricultural enterprises by procuring various equipment and tools including a Governance in Moraikobai is now more comfortable and efficient as residents, visitors, and staff benefit from the new lavatory, furniture, and equipment at the village office. Finally, the villagers invested in a Pontoon and will upgrade an internal trail to improve transportation.

What do residents have to say?

As a community, we decided to rear chickens using our carbon credit money, so that villagers would always have chicken at a low cost instead of buying it from outside for a lot of money during shortages” - Mr Jeff Bonaparte

“We learnt valuable lessons about Moraikobai’s soil and savannah cultivation from our pilot project that will be used to develop agriculture for food security and revenue generation in our village” –Ms Rosanne Rollox

“I am happy with all the development taking place in my village. As a cook, I look forward to being employed in the kitchen under construction, so that I can treat all the tourists to my delicious cooking and earn more money for my family” – Ms Naiomi Andrews

Moraikobai’s secret to success and what comes next

Mr Derrick John, Toshao & Chairperson, NTC

Amid the implementation of its projects, Moraikobai encountered unusually dry conditions which delayed the start of its full agriculture programme – especially, the crop component. Nonetheless, the people of Moraikobai are resilient and they remain steadfast to their agricultural vision which will be set in motion as soon as the weather becomes conducive. Moreover, Moraikobai overcame the lack of skilled persons within the village and successfully progressed on all its civil projects. The Toshao and Chairperson of the National Toshaos’ Council (NTC) commended the government on the revolutionary LCDS and expressed appreciation on behalf of Guyana’s Indigenous population for their ongoing development due to the direct injection of carbon credit revenue into villages across the country.

Potarinau, Region 9

The lives of Potarinau residents improve drastically through 100 livelihood projects at the household level with finance from Guyana’s remarkable carbon credit revenue

Potarinau and the LCDS 2030

Potarinau is an Indigenous village on the west bank of the Sawariwau Creek in South Central Rupununi, Region 9. It has 3 satellites which are Baitoon, Katuur, and Shiriri. The village is currently named after a giant stingray, but it was initially known as Ambrose (for its first Toshao).  About 675 persons mostly of Wapichan descent live in Potarinau. For 2023, they received G$ 24,000,000 of Guyana’s carbon credit revenue through the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030. The residents decided to have livelihood projects at the household level that are mostly agricultural in nature to contribute to the sustainable development of Potarinau. The project areas are graphically highlighted in the pie chart below:

Potarinau and the LCDS – 2023 at a glance

Potarinau’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Potarinau’s 2023 LCDS developmental projects

Potarinau kickstarted its agriculture programme by purchasing 130 cattle for 66 households at an approximate cost of G$ 10.4 million. The village also spent about G$ 4.6 million to acquire poultry, feed, equipment, and medicine for 15 households. By rearing these animals, the village’s food security would increase, and households would have the opportunity to earn money by selling animal products.

Poultry flocking
Cattle grazing


Regarding the non-agricultural livelihood projects, 19 households opted to pursue opportunities that include small shops, welding, construction, fuel sale and other micro-enterprises. The village invested over G$ 3.6 million to procure various tools, equipment, materials, and supplies for these ventures. Such activities are important because they provide necessary goods and services to cater to the developing needs of Potarinau. They also empower residents to have businesses with high earning potentials

A set of Total tools
A stocked shop (14 total shops)



Potarinau kickstarted its agriculture programme by purchasing 130 cattle for 66 households at an approximate cost of G$ 10.4 million. The village also spent about G$ 4.6 million to acquire poultry, feed, equipment, and medicine for 15 households. By rearing these animals, the village’s food security would increase, and households would have the opportunity to earn money by selling animal products.

Poultry flocking
Cattle grazing


Regarding the non-agricultural livelihood projects, 19 households opted to pursue opportunities that include small shops, welding, construction, fuel sale and other micro-enterprises. The village invested over G$ 3.6 million to procure various tools, equipment, materials, and supplies for these ventures. Such activities are important because they provide necessary goods and services to cater to the developing needs of Potarinau. They also empower residents to have businesses with high earning potentials

A set of Total tools
A stocked shop (14 total shops)



What do residents have to say?

I used the carbon credits to stock up my shop and buy a stove with an oven. I am happy to help supply other residents with the items they need which include the snacks that I prepare. I also do beautification (makeup and nails) at the shop. Now, my family always has finances for our needs. In fact, business is so good that I have already purchased a solar power system for my shop and a motorcycle for me that would help me to grow my business” – Ms Theresa Gomes, Resident

“We are thankful for the LCDS. The cattle I got from the carbon credits is a big help to me. In the future, Potarinau will have many cattle. We will produce plenty of beef and milk that will earn us a lot of money. The future of the village will be bright, the children will benefit from the beef and milk” – Mr Merculus Fernandes, Resident

“I took welding and construction tools and equipment with the carbon credit money. Now, my work is easier and I can take on bigger jobs. I am earning more income for myself and my family. I am on track to setting up my own workshop” – Mr Barimus Andrew, Resident

Potarinau’s success story and Looking ahead

Potarinau had negligible procurement and transportation challenges that the village council and LCDS management and finance team overcame. For instance, thorough research was done on chick suppliers and chicks were transported in the evenings to ensure their comfort and reduce heat stress. Moreover, the village credits strong financial practices for their current success which include accurate budgeting and the production of receipts.

Mr Peter Stanislaus

Peter Stanislaus, Toshao, Potarinau praised the LCDS. He said that such projects are a first for his village and that development is evident. He is pleased by the advancement of all Indigenous people across the country. Before Potarinau embarks on its 2024 LCDS carbon credit projects, it will complete its 2023 agriculture programme by acquiring swine and sheep in addition to all the necessary inputs for kitchen gardening for several additional households.

 

QUIKO, REGION 9

Bountiful harvests result from Quiko’s use of carbon credit funds for savannah farming  while the livelihoods of women and youths experience remarkable development

Quiko is one of  Shulinab village’s two satellites (Meriwua is the other). It is located in South Central Rupununi, Region 9. Quiko is a Macushi word that describes the seed and juice of a native palm tree’s fruit. The residents of this Indigenous satellite (roughly 200 in total) are the beneficiaries of G$ 18,000,000 worth of carbon credits from Guyana’s Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) 2030. They collectively decided to undertake and fund 6 diverse projects to enhance their sustainable development. These projects are illustrated by thematic areas below

Quiko and the LCDS – 2023 at glance

Quiko’s 2023 LCDS investment areas

Quiko’s 2023 developmental projects

A row of shallots

To ensure the food security of Quiko, residents of the satellite plugged half of their 2023 LCDS allocation (G$ 9 million) into farming. More specifically, they embarked upon savannah farming for the first time in their history. Since June 2023, the farm has provided employment opportunities for residents and produced a variety of crops which include shallot, bora, pumpkin, and watermelon.

Quiko invested G$ 6 million of its carbon credits revenue in 2 special societal groups within the satellite, i.e., women and youths. Quiko’s Women’s Group received a new Kitchen in addition to  various equipment and tools necessary for garment production and catering. These include sewing machines, fabrics, a stove, and cooking utensils.

 

Equipment in use by a resident at the document centre
Quiko’s First Church

The Youth’s document centre was fully equipped, and furnished with personal computers, printers, a generator, a freezer, workstations, and chairs at a cost of G$ 2 million. These investments help to ensure that both the women and youths of Quiko are financially independent. Moreover, the satellite expended another G$ 2 million to deliver its first church to the people of the community.

A row of shallots

To ensure the food security of Quiko, residents of the satellite plugged half of their 2023 LCDS allocation (G$ 9 million) into farming. More specifically, they embarked upon savannah farming for the first time in their history. Since June 2023, the farm has provided employment opportunities for residents and produced a variety of crops which include shallot, bora, pumpkin, and watermelon.

Quiko invested G$ 6 million of its carbon credits revenue in 2 special societal groups within the satellite, i.e., women and youths. Quiko’s Women’s Group received a new Kitchen in addition to  various equipment and tools necessary for garment production and catering. These include sewing machines, fabrics, a stove, and cooking utensils.

 

Equipment in use by a resident at the document centre
Quiko’s First Church

The Youth’s document centre was fully equipped, and furnished with personal computers, printers, a generator, a freezer, workstations, and chairs at a cost of G$ 2 million. These investments help to ensure that both the women and youths of Quiko are financially independent. Moreover, the satellite expended another G$ 2 million to deliver its first church to the people of the community.

What do residents have to say?

“The women of Quiko came together and came up with the idea to use the carbon credit money for a women’s group in the community. We provide necessary services to the village like making clothes and catering. This group allows the Quiko women to earn a living” – Ms Elizabeth Ignacio: Vice-chairperson, Quiko’s Women’s Group

“We are very happy about our savannah farm project. It is providing a lot of jobs for the youths, so they do not need to leave Quiko. The farm is profitable, and it produces food for our residents, Shulinab’s Hot Meal Kitchen, and Restaurants in Lethem” – Mr Aiden Eusebio, Teacher & Resident

“The LCDS is so helpful. We are now able to offer a range of services not only to the people of Quiko, but the surrounding communities as well. Everyone is benefitting. Children use the computers to do their schoolwork and adults come here to conduct business. They no longer have to go all the way to Lethem” - Ms Veronica Ignacio, Document Centre Employee

Quiko’s success story and Looking ahead

Mr Ronald Ignatius

The residents of Quiko faced and quickly surmounted the challenges of water shortage and pests to ensure that the first set of crops from their savannah farm was bountiful. They also trained their youths in several areas of information technology, so that the document centre could be fully operational. These included electronic document preparation and management, internet browsing, printing, photocopying, and laminating. Mr Ronald Ignatius, Senior Councillor, Quiko commended the LCDS Carbon Credit Programme for providing the finance for his satellite to undertake longstanding developmental works that delivered tangible results and benefits to the people of Quiko who are grateful. He noted that residents decided to venture mainly into livestock projects with their upcoming 2024 LCDS funds

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